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The Malbec Revolution

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Red wine recaptures its status and pizzazz


In years past, Malbec had faded into the darkness, mostly as an unacknowledged blending grape. Things quickly changed as Argentine wine makers allured the grape into luscious, self-indulgent bottles. Soon after, French wine makers recaptured and restored its desirability and pizzazz too. Nowadays, misperceived Malbec that was once overlooked is no longer the anonymous grape it used to be. Malbec is finally getting the glorification, nurturing and notice that should be due from wine makers, and wine enthusiasts of New Orleans are wising up, particularly those who favor reds with rich tannins and juicy, lavish fruits.

Formerly, Malbec was most notorious as a junior member of a group called blend in Bordeaux wines. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc were the prevailing forces of that group. However, when the desolating, overwhelming frosts in 1956 demolished many acres of Bordeaux Malbec, most people opted to replant with more powerful, seasoned vines. From that point on, Malbec has skyrocketed in Bordeaux.

While Malbec may be a little spiritless and washed out in Bordeaux, it is definitely blossoming and successful in the southwestern French appellation of Cahors, a place where red wines are mandated by the law to have at least 70 percent Malbec, sometimes referred to as Auxerrois. The remaining 30 percent may consist of plentiful, super-abundant Merlot and/or forcibly enthralling Tannat. Still, there are often times when Cahors is 100 percent pure Malbec.

Malbec is pleasing and gratifying when aged. Consistent with the variety’s heritage, Malbecs from Argentina thrive when mixed with Bordeaux varieties, so you should not steer clear of those special variations of the Malbec type. Do not be disheartened about cellaring them for a couple years either. Aging often enchants them with even more spice and thrill in their lauded bottles. That applies to Cahors as well.

The Cahors area is immersed in an age-old tradition of hazy, dark wines. As a matter of fact, these wines were once acclaimed as the ‘black wines of Cahors’ because an allowance of the wine was steamed for the purpose of concentrating the deep color and flavor. Though the mere idea of this may make contemporary wine makers cringe in their Chianti, way back when, these wines were even more highly revered and treasured than Bordeaux himself. During the history of Cahors, its winegrowers have stuck soundly and tightly to Malbec. Indeed, when the same devastating frosts of 1956 affected Cahors, winegrowers did not bat an eye, faithfully and devotedly replanting with their most enamored variety.

Today, the genius and virtue of Cahors’ wines is getting noticed and there has never been a more appropriate moment to sample them. The champion attributes of Cahors’ ostentatious legacy remains strongly anchored as others make inroads. Mainly, Cahors are recognized for their deep flavor and splendid, out-of-this-world richness that comes from using modern vineyard and winery magic combined with sophistication and adeptness. And, people no longer have to boil.

Credit is due to world-class Argentina. For a high number of enthusiasts, Argentina is home to the greatest Malbec that exists in this part of the solar system. Experts often acknowledge the uncommon, one-of-a-kind climate in Argentina as an imperative prerequisite for this marvelous, spiritualistic medley. There is a unique blend of high altitude and hot afternoons intermixed with cool, breezy nights, which mostly surpass the amount of growing days before the grapes have to be picked.

Lastly, if you have food in your thoughts, beef should be the keyword. The people of Argentina consume more beef compared to other places so it should not come as a shock that Malbec’s lighthearted combination of ripe, juicy flavors and tannins makes the ideal side for grilled steaks, roasts and stews.

In years past, Malbec had faded into the darkness, mostly as an unacknowledged blending grape. Things quickly changed as Argentine wine makers allured the grape into luscious, self-indulgent bottles. Soon after, French wine makers recaptured and restored its desirability and pizzazz too. Nowadays, misperceived Malbec that was once overlooked is no longer the anonymous grape it used to be. Malbec is finally getting the glorification, nurturing and notice that should be due from wine makers, and wine enthusiasts of New Orleans are wising up, particularly those who favor reds with rich tannins and juicy, lavish fruits.

Formerly, Malbec was most notorious as a junior member of a group called blend in Bordeaux wines. Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc were the prevailing forces of that group. However, when the desolating, overwhelming frosts in 1956 demolished many acres of Bordeaux Malbec, most people opted to replant with more powerful, seasoned vines. From that point on, Malbec has skyrocketed in Bordeaux.

While Malbec may be a little spiritless and washed out in Bordeaux, it is definitely blossoming and successful in the southwestern French appellation of Cahors, a place where red wines are mandated by the law to have at least 70 percent Malbec, sometimes referred to as Auxerrois. The remaining 30 percent may consist of plentiful, super-abundant Merlot and/or forcibly enthralling Tannat. Still, there are often times when Cahors is 100 percent pure Malbec.

Malbec is pleasing and gratifying when aged. Consistent with the variety’s heritage, Malbecs from Argentina thrive when mixed with Bordeaux varieties, so you should not steer clear of those special variations of the Malbec type. Do not be disheartened about cellaring them for a couple years either. Aging often enchants them with even more spice and thrill in their lauded bottles. That applies to Cahors as well.

The Cahors area is immersed in an age-old tradition of hazy, dark wines. As a matter of fact, these wines were once acclaimed as the ‘black wines of Cahors’ because an allowance of the wine was steamed for the purpose of concentrating the deep color and flavor. Though the mere idea of this may make contemporary wine makers cringe in their Chianti, way back when, these wines were even more highly revered and treasured than Bordeaux himself. During the history of Cahors, its winegrowers have stuck soundly and tightly to Malbec. Indeed, when the same devastating frosts of 1956 affected Cahors, winegrowers did not bat an eye, faithfully and devotedly replanting with their most enamored variety.

Today, the genius and virtue of Cahors’ wines is getting noticed and there has never been a more appropriate moment to sample them. The champion attributes of Cahors’ ostentatious legacy remains strongly anchored as others make inroads. Mainly, Cahors are recognized for their deep flavor and splendid, out-of-this-world richness that comes from using modern vineyard and winery magic combined with sophistication and adeptness. And, people no longer have to boil.

Credit is due to world-class Argentina. For a high number of enthusiasts, Argentina is home to the greatest Malbec that exists in this part of the solar system. Experts often acknowledge the uncommon, one-of-a-kind climate in Argentina as an imperative prerequisite for this marvelous, spiritualistic medley. There is a unique blend of high altitude and hot afternoons intermixed with cool, breezy nights, which mostly surpass the amount of growing days before the grapes have to be picked.

Lastly, if you have food in your thoughts, beef should be the keyword. The people of Argentina consume more beef compared to other places so it should not come as a shock that Malbec’s lighthearted combination of ripe, juicy flavors and tannins makes the ideal side for grilled steaks, roasts and stews.